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Matt Siegfried

Matt Siegfried

Matt was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio and landed in Michigan in the 1990s after moving around quite a bit. He has lived in Ypsilanti since 2001 and is a graduate of Eastern Michigan University with degrees in History and Historic Preservation. Much of his work has been on Ypsilanti’s local history its connections to broad historical moments. He has focused on Ypsilanti’s rich Native American and African-American history, producing a website which details the development of Ypsi’s Black community. Matt believes that the landscape and built environment we walk through every day is alive with worlds of history and can speak to us about why we live the way we live today. Matt can be reached at msiegfr@gmail.com.

water tower 1889

The Story Behind Ypsilanti’s Iconic Water Tower August 25, 2015 by | Comment on this

The Story behind Ypsilanti’s Iconic Water Tower | By: Matt Siegfried Ypsilanti postcard. 1950’s. Everyone knows the Water Tower, the butt of innumerable jokes and the most recognizable Ypsi landmark. Much has been written about the tower, finished in 1890, that stands at the highest point in the city on the corner of the appropriately […]

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Don’t Take Ypsilanti’s Parks for Granted, They Haven’t Always Been Here June 24, 2015 by | Comment on this

Don’t Take Ypsilanti’s Parks for Granted, They Haven’t Always Been Here | By: Matt Siegfried It’s hard to imagine Ypsilanti without her parks and the celebrations, festivals, ballgames and evening walks that they host. We take for granted our parks, but they haven’t always been there, and sometimes it took great effort to make them […]

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1923woodrufs

Ypsilanti: What’s in a Name? January 27, 2015 by | Comment on this

“Ypsilanti” (ĭp′•sĭ•lăn′•tē) is a daunting name to pronounce for those unfamiliar with it. However, its very unusualness is central to Ypsilantians sense of the uniqueness of their community. How did a town in southern Michigan, known for many hundreds of years in Native Iroquoian and Algonquian languages, and later settled by French and English-speakers end […]

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